colour on the walls

nobody's actually reading this

35 notes

Anonymous asked: why has the Times list got you upset?

letsmakeloaf:

Laverne Cox, one of the first if not the first transwoman of color to be not only a lead character on national television, but also an award winning actress, was not included in the time magazine 100 most influential people, EVEN THOUGH she got 90% POSITIVE RESULTS ON A NATION WIDE POLL GIVEN BY TIME TO CHOOSE WHO WOULD BE ON THE LIST. BIGOTRY AND OBVIOUS DISCRIMINATION RUFFLES MY FEATHERS.

3,739 notes

Anonymous asked: Maybe if I get skinnier he'll love me.

alonesomes:

Your body is not a house that you have to clean up before guests come. Your body is yours and yours alone. If he doesn’t love you, then he doesn’t love you. Your body is not the offering or the deal you make, okay? I know that feeling, that thought process. Maybe if I just lost the weight, I’d be lovable. Stop it in its tracks. You are the most important person in your life. Love yourself more than the idea of being good enough for someone else. You are a force of nature, okay? Be here. In your body. You’re allowed.

13,605 notes

itsjustkiikii:

chocolateist:

i-want-cheese:

bakaandty:

i-want-cheese:

blogorgtfo:

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

Back when I was younger and more ignorant and misinformed than I am now, one of my exes literally made me feel guilty sometimes when he got a boner and I didn’t want to “take care of him”. He claimed that it caused him a lot of pain and he said that his doctor had actually said he couldn’t leave himself in that state or else he could damage himself…. So made me feel like I HAD to give him relief even when I really did not desire to. And that sucked.

Wait… it DOESN’T hurt them?

Boys get boners all the time for no reason. No, it doesn’t hurt them. If any boy tries to tell you otherwise, run away as fast as you can because he’s lying to you for the sake of his penis.

No penis is more important than you because you are a whole person and a penis is just a spongy flab o’ flesh. 

Hahaha deff not I get boners constantly.
Math
Driving
Light
Anything causes them

Favorite answer so far.

Math.

In sex ed they even try to push that. They try to tell you that it’s painful and uncomfortable.
And I had an ex that did the same exact thing to me as the op.

(via sexgenderbody)

14,088 notes

slurhater:

jamietheignorantamerican:

YES, there are people who find cultural appropriation and the use of slurs “ok” with them.

Does that mean it’s “ok” to do it to EVERYONE, even if they might be personally offended by it?

nOOOOOOOOOOOO.

Also it is very important to realize that your irl friends saying this shit is ok may be out of a desire to not start drama and get into arguments. I fucking detest when straight people say faggot but I have a few straight friends who do and it is just not worth the shit to tell them to stop.

(via sexgenderbody)

5,032 notes

chicklikemeblog:

kickyouwithmyfists:

fandomsandfeminism:

duchess-von-finger-bang:

fandomsandfeminism:

The difference between Bisexuality and Pansexuality: A Powerpoint Guide (Slightly updated)

spot fucking on

I really like this, and the section on “do find differences between genders and find different things attractive about them” versus “It’s not a factor” actually is something I’ve never seen written out so well before, as a legit distinction between bi and pan.

(via sexgenderbody)

267 notes

submissivefeminist:

Addressing Rape Culture: Power, Privilege, and Patriarchy
Last week, my campus hosted an event with Zerlina Maxwell, a political activist. Zerlina’s presentation focused on rape culture, and some of her work in this area. While much of the presentation was meant to explain what rape culture is and give countless examples on how the media, in particular, perpetuates this concept, Zerlina also explained her ideas on solutions to this problem.
The solution, she says, is to end the emphasis on teaching women to protecting themselves (as useful as this can be to some) and to shift the goal of this movement to teaching men not to rape. 99% of rapists are men, and yet, “rape prevention” is usually a concept taught to women. This really fails to be an actual solution to the problem. Prevention needs to be shifted to the perpetrator and not the victim/survivor.
Zerlina was featured on FOX News and received a lot of criticism for saying that we should teach men not to rape. The idea is seemingly too simplistic, no? Fact of the matter is that rape is a socialized norm and young boys are quite literally taught to act in ways that can lead to sexual assaults and other means of violence against women. The solution is clear—reconstruct the socialization of boys in order to create better men.
Zerlina wrote an article following her interview with FOX News because she received so much negative attention (including rape threats).

1. Teach young men about legal consent: Legal consent is number one for a reason. Without it, sexual contact with someone is rape whether you intended to rape or not. A woman who is drunk, unconscious, sleeping cannot give legal consent. And it’s not about a woman simply saying “no,” it’s really about making certain she’s saying yes.
2. Teach young men to see women’s humanity, instead of seeing them as sexual objects there for male pleasure:  There is a reason why women are shamed into silence and teenage boys in Steubenville, Ohio are caught on camera laughing about gang raping an unconscious girl at a party. The dehumanization of women spans all areas of American life.
3. Teach young men how to express healthy masculinity: The question that’s being asked about what women can do to prevent violence against them is the wrong question. It’s not what can a woman say or do that can prevent being attacked. We need to turn that paradigm.
4. Teach young men to believe women who come forward and not to blame the victim: The vast majority of women do not report their rapes to the police and many more only tell one or two people in confidence. 
5. Teach young men about bystander intervention: Both Men Stopping Violence and Men Can Stop Rape have bystander intervention workshops for men of all ages. “It’s about community accountability,” says Pandit, “We require men to talk to other men in their lives and tell them about these programs. It is important that we have community networks that hold men accountable.”
(Source)

Her article is much more detailed, and you can check the source above for the full explanation. She outlines some really important ideas that could greatly reduce sexual assaults committed by men. These ideas are not far-fetched. They’re entirely possible, and work is being done in this area across the country. New programs are being developed to focus on socializing young men and boys to be better men. Bystander intervention training is also being done so that men can learn to identify problematic situations and make choices that prevent sexual assaults.
Zerlina was highly criticized for saying that women shouldn’t need guns to protect themselves from sexual assault and while she’s not suggesting women shouldn’t have a means to defend their bodies, she’s saying this should not be the primary focus when dealing with sexual assault prevention. Fighting back is not prevention, it’s intervention. It may deter a crime but the problem still remains that men are attempting sexual assaults in very high numbers, regardless of the victim/survivor’s ability to defend themselves. The problem lies with hypermasculinity and the culture we live in that often sympathizes with the attacker—especially if they are young. (Case in point: Steubenville)
We need to shift this focus to bring change. We need to stop telling women to defend themselves and start telling men that consent matters. A large number of studies have shown that most men don’t even know that the crimes they have committed against women are, in fact, sexual assaults. This is a huge problem, and it needs to be addressed. Educating young boys about consent is Zerlina’s first suggestion as a solution to this problem, and I fully agree that it is of the upmost importance.
xx SF

submissivefeminist:

Addressing Rape Culture: Power, Privilege, and Patriarchy

Last week, my campus hosted an event with Zerlina Maxwell, a political activist. Zerlina’s presentation focused on rape culture, and some of her work in this area. While much of the presentation was meant to explain what rape culture is and give countless examples on how the media, in particular, perpetuates this concept, Zerlina also explained her ideas on solutions to this problem.

The solution, she says, is to end the emphasis on teaching women to protecting themselves (as useful as this can be to some) and to shift the goal of this movement to teaching men not to rape. 99% of rapists are men, and yet, “rape prevention” is usually a concept taught to women. This really fails to be an actual solution to the problem. Prevention needs to be shifted to the perpetrator and not the victim/survivor.

Zerlina was featured on FOX News and received a lot of criticism for saying that we should teach men not to rape. The idea is seemingly too simplistic, no? Fact of the matter is that rape is a socialized norm and young boys are quite literally taught to act in ways that can lead to sexual assaults and other means of violence against women. The solution is clear—reconstruct the socialization of boys in order to create better men.

Zerlina wrote an article following her interview with FOX News because she received so much negative attention (including rape threats).

1. Teach young men about legal consent: Legal consent is number one for a reason. Without it, sexual contact with someone is rape whether you intended to rape or not. A woman who is drunk, unconscious, sleeping cannot give legal consent. And it’s not about a woman simply saying “no,” it’s really about making certain she’s saying yes.

2. Teach young men to see women’s humanity, instead of seeing them as sexual objects there for male pleasure:  There is a reason why women are shamed into silence and teenage boys in Steubenville, Ohio are caught on camera laughing about gang raping an unconscious girl at a party. The dehumanization of women spans all areas of American life.

3. Teach young men how to express healthy masculinity: The question that’s being asked about what women can do to prevent violence against them is the wrong question. It’s not what can a woman say or do that can prevent being attacked. We need to turn that paradigm.

4. Teach young men to believe women who come forward and not to blame the victim: The vast majority of women do not report their rapes to the police and many more only tell one or two people in confidence.

5. Teach young men about bystander intervention: Both Men Stopping Violence and Men Can Stop Rape have bystander intervention workshops for men of all ages. “It’s about community accountability,” says Pandit, “We require men to talk to other men in their lives and tell them about these programs. It is important that we have community networks that hold men accountable.”

(Source)

Her article is much more detailed, and you can check the source above for the full explanation. She outlines some really important ideas that could greatly reduce sexual assaults committed by men. These ideas are not far-fetched. They’re entirely possible, and work is being done in this area across the country. New programs are being developed to focus on socializing young men and boys to be better men. Bystander intervention training is also being done so that men can learn to identify problematic situations and make choices that prevent sexual assaults.

Zerlina was highly criticized for saying that women shouldn’t need guns to protect themselves from sexual assault and while she’s not suggesting women shouldn’t have a means to defend their bodies, she’s saying this should not be the primary focus when dealing with sexual assault prevention. Fighting back is not prevention, it’s intervention. It may deter a crime but the problem still remains that men are attempting sexual assaults in very high numbers, regardless of the victim/survivor’s ability to defend themselves. The problem lies with hypermasculinity and the culture we live in that often sympathizes with the attacker—especially if they are young. (Case in point: Steubenville)

We need to shift this focus to bring change. We need to stop telling women to defend themselves and start telling men that consent matters. A large number of studies have shown that most men don’t even know that the crimes they have committed against women are, in fact, sexual assaults. This is a huge problem, and it needs to be addressed. Educating young boys about consent is Zerlina’s first suggestion as a solution to this problem, and I fully agree that it is of the upmost importance.

xx SF

(via sexgenderbody)

7,255 notes

multiplemouthedfeline:

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

Derealization! That kinda sounds like the episodes I have. Shit’s scary T-T

(via probablybutprobablynotzach)